Shalom Aleichem
~ Peace Upon You ~


Shalom aleichem, malachei hasharet, malachei Elyon, mimelech malchei ham'lachim, HaKadosh Baruch Hu
Shalom upon you, O ministering angels, angels of the Exalted One--from the King Who reigns over kings, the Holy One, Blessed is He.

Bo-achem l'shalom, malachei ha-shalom, malachei Elyon, mimelech malchei ham'lachim, HaKadosh Baruch Hu
May your coming be for shalom, O angels of shalom, angels of the Exalted One--from the King Who reigns over kings, the Holy One, Blessed is He.

Bar'chuni l'shalom, malachei hashalom, malachei Elyon, mimelech malchei ham'lachim, HaKadosh Baruch Hu
Bless me for shalom, O angels of shalom, angels of the Exalted One--from the King Who reigns over kings, the Holy One, Blessed is He.

Tzeit'chem l'shalom, malachei hashalom, malachei Elyon, mimelech malchei ham'lachim, HaKadosh Baruch Hu
May your departure be to shalom, O angels of shalom, angels of the Exalted One--from the King who reigns over kings, the Holy One, Blessed is He.


This is a song for welcoming Shabbat, traditionally sung as the family gathers around the table on Friday night. It is believed to have been written in the 17th century, inspired by Talmudic legend. Rabbi Yosi ben Yehuda taught: "Two ministering angels, one good and one bad, escort a person home from the synagogue on Shabbat eve. When he comes home and finds the candles lit, the table set, and the bed made, the good angel says, 'May it be G-d's will that it also be so next Shabbat,' and the bad angel is compelled to say 'Amein.' But if the house is not prepared for Shabbat, then the bad angel says, 'May it be G-d's will that it also be so next Shabbat,' and the good angel has to say 'Amein.'"

The Shalom Aleichem song is based on the above. If every Jew is accompanied home by two ministering angels, then it is only proper that he greet them, bless them, and seek their blessing.

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